Dementia

If someone you love or care for is showing the following signs they could be showing early signs of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease:

  • memory loss

  • difficulty concentrating

  • finding it hard to carry out familiar daily tasks, such as getting confused over the correct change when shopping

  • struggling to follow a conversation or find the right word

  • being confused about time and place

  • mood changes (source)

It is estimated that 50 million people worldwide have been diagnosed with dementia and a new diagnosis is made every 3 seconds (source). Seeing someone you care for losing some of their memory and independence is very upsetting and can leave you feeling powerless.

Memory Lane Games was founded by two people who set out to support their parents (one with vascular dementia) with cognitive decline and this simple app has proved to be more helpful than they ever imagined!

The app provides a free, practical and effective way for families and carers to interact positively with their loved ones or clients.  

The library of simple trivia games is professionally curated to generate frustration-free opportunities for reminiscence on topics such as music, food, history, pets and places.  You may even find a game about your local area or home town!  The games are designed to gently spark nostalgia, happy memories and to start wonderful conversations.

The Memory Lane Games app includes over 1000 easy-to-play games and is being actively used in memory cafés, health care professionals, caregivers and family members around the world to: 

  • Calm 

  • Reduce agitation

  • Stimulate speech

  • Bring to mind positive memories

  • Generate pleasant conversations.

Because the games are not designed to test (no scoring!) but to stimulate memories and conversation, playing

the app creates an enjoyable experience without frustration. 

 

Download the app now to make a difference for someone with dementia. 

“The Memory Lane

Games app develops social

interaction between carers and

patients with dementia, elicits positive impact for both and improves the mood of the patient, making taking care of them easier.  It’s a good conversation starter.” 

Dr Jemellee Cano –

Board member, Alzheimer's Disease

Association of the Philippines.